Apr 04, 2020  
Catalog 2014-2015 
    
Catalog 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


The courses listed in this Catalog are all the courses that CCV has approved for the 2014-15 academic year. Though approved, some of these courses may not be offered during the ‘14-‘15 academic year. Several months before the start of each semester, CCV publishes a Schedule that indicates what courses are available in particular locations and the exact times and dates for that semester.

NOTE ON PREREQUISITES: Because basic academic skills (reading, writing, math) are prerequisites for CCV college-level courses, they are not always listed in each course’s description.

View Essential Learning Objectives

 

Business

  
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    BUS 1140 - Global Business, Culture and Economics

    Credits: 3
    In today’s global economy business people must understand the relationships, institutions and environment that underlie international commerce. In this course students will examine the impact of globalization on countries, small and large businesses, and individuals. This course is an introduction to the global economy that will address both theoretical and practical dimensions of global business operations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1190 - Health & Safety in the Work Environment

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to equipment, practices, and procedures that promote a healthy, safe, and secure work environment. Components of this course include safety culture, environmental regulations and enforcement, corporate responsibility, risk analysis and communication, facility and transportation management, hazardous waste management, and emergency planning and response.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2410 - Human Resource Management

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the critical issues and the strategic questions that must be considered when managing diverse groups of people in today’s workplace. Topics include: selecting, training, and evaluating personnel; compensation; health and safety; bargaining units; motivation; morale; and human relations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1010 - Introduction to Business

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the characteristics, organization, and operation of business, including organization and management, production planning and control, marketing, finance, day-to-day operations in the areas of accounting, personnel, research and development, and management information systems.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2360 - Leadership Development

    Credits: 3
    This course will focus on the development of leadership ability by providing a basic understanding of leadership and group dynamics theory, including goal setting, decision making, problem solving, delegation, motivation and performance evaluation. Students will develop a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and an awareness of their own ability and style of leadership.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1550 - Manufacturing Systems

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of manufacturing systems and processes. Students will discuss the importance of quality assurance and continuous improvement and the role of customer-supplier relationships in manufacturing. Students will examine the impact of manufacturing on local, national and global economies and the environment.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2070 - Organizational Behavior & Management

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the major elements of managerial and supervisory functions in business organizations and studies the dynamics of human behavior that affect their success. Topics include motivation, leadership, job and organizational design as well as the managerial functions of business planning, staffing, compliance, finance, compensation, and training. Examines the history of management science and explores such contemporary concepts as employee involvement, cultural diversity, and globalization.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1330 - Personal & Professional Effectiveness

    Credits: 1
    Becoming highly effective, both personally and professionally, requires a dedication to proactive behaviors, strategies and skills including setting goals, planning, time management, and working well with others. This course explores these skills and illustrates ways to weave them into daily practice.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2140 - Personal Finance

    Credits: 3
    A study of the tools used in personal financial planning. The student is introduced to the process used by professional planners and shown how this can be helpful in planning their own financial futures.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2260 - Principles of Financial Management

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the basic principles and practices of financial management. Includes the nature and scope of finance, sources of funds, financial planning and decision making, and special situations in financial management.

    Prerequisites:   


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    BUS 2020 - Principles of Management

    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to the philosophy, principles, and techniques of management. Students will examine classical, modern, and emerging concepts as they relate to today’s manager and the functional processes of planning, organizing, directing and controlling resources. Learning experiences may include case studies, team experiences and simulations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2230 - Principles of Marketing

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the role of marketing as it relates to manufacturing, wholesale, retail, and service businesses. Topics include product development, pricing decisions, promotional considerations, and distribution options of both goods and services. Students will also examine the emerging role of electronic marketing and its impact on today’s businesses.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1320 - Principles of Supervision

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the basic elements of supervision. Topics covered include communication, goal setting, delegation, time and stress management, performance appraisal, the hiring process, motivation, and responses to technology.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1150 - Professional Financial Literacy

    Credits: 3
    This course addresses financing, accounting, and money management techniques necessary for successful business practices and includes an emphasis on personal application. Principles of money management include establishing financial goals and objectives; developing and monitoring budgets; managing cash flow; recording deposits and withdrawals; and implementing procedures for managing debt. Financing topics include managing and controlling money and assets to successfully carry out business activities, determining risks associated with obtaining business credit, and identifying sources of financial assistance. Students will learn accounting principles including implementing accounting procedures and financial reports; preparing an estimated/projected income statement, estimating cash-flow needs; preparing an estimated/projected balance sheet; determining and depositing payroll taxes; and filing tax returns.

    Prerequisites:  


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    BUS 1180 - Quality Process

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to the principles of quality assurance, lean manufacturing, quality improvement, inspecting for quality, and continuous improvement to ensure that products and processes meet quality system requirements. Students will learn entry-level critical work functions to ensure materials, processes, and final products meet quality specifications and to support and maintain quality systems.

    Prerequisites:   or equivalent skills


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    BUS 2210 - Small Business Management

    Credits: 3
    This course explores the practical aspects of organizing and managing a small business. It is designed to equip students with the skills and knowledge to make informed business decisions. Topics include the basic concepts of accounting, finance, cash management, taxes, business law, government regulations, staffing, and marketing.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2430 - Small Business Marketing

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to principles and techniques of marketing with specific applications to the small business: problems and solutions in marketing research, advertising, pricing, and selling. Topics include data collection and interpretation, choice and use of media, analyzing marketing mix and pricing in small business situations, and the principles and stages of the selling process.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 2160 - Supply Chain Logistics

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of planning and monitoring the movement and storage of materials and products in coordination with suppliers, internal systems, and customers. Students will learn the elements of the supply chain, inventory management methods, and product packaging and distribution concerns.

    Prerequisites:  


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    BUS 1290 - Transportation Finance, Planning & Regulation

    Credits: 3
    This course further develops context and concepts introduced in the Transportation Systems & Operations course. Students will learn how transportation systems evolved through technological change and private and public investments. The course will explore government and private frameworks to build and maintain transportation infrastructure. Students will analyze transportation regulatory systems and discuss future funding scenarios and investment strategies within these systems. The course will broadly address the global transportation system with an emphasis on the United States and Vermont. Recommended prior learning: Transportation Systems & Operations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. 


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    BUS 1280 - Transportation Systems & Operations

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of the roles of major modes of transportation and how they work together to form the transportation system. The financial and regulatory components of the transportation system will be introduced. Students will examine the impact of transportation on local, national, and global economies, public systems, and the environment. The course will highlight public and private job opportunities in transportation and the skills needed for career development.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1170 - Workflow Design & Analysis

    Credits: 3
    This course addresses the understanding of workflow and uses of information in business settings. Topics include concepts of processes and process analysis; process representation; interpreting and creating process diagrams; and process validation and change management. Special emphasis will be placed on processes used to facilitate decision making necessary to optimize the success of businesses.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    BUS 1160 - Working in a Professional Environment

    Credits: 3
    This course addresses the importance of one’s role in the functioning of a company and the potential impact one’s own performance can have on the success of the organization. Students will study cultural competence and explore the ability to understand, communicate with, and interact effectively with people of different cultures. Topics related to professionalism include demonstrating respect for coworkers, colleagues, and customers and acting in the best interest of the company, the community, and the environment. Students will learn techniques for planning and prioritizing work to manage time effectively and accomplish assigned tasks. Communication skills include the ability to reach formal or informal agreements that promote mutual goals and interests, and obtain commitment to those agreements from individuals or groups.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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Chemistry

  
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    CHE 1031 - General Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    This is the first course of a two-semester sequence on the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, modern atomic theory, liquids and solids, and molecular structure. Prior learning in    or equivalent is strongly recommended.

    Prerequisites:   or above


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    CHE 2110 - Introduction to Organic Chemistry & Biochemistry

    Credits: 4
    A follow-up to Introductory Chemistry, designed to enhance student knowledge and skills in the specific area of organic chemistry. The course will include a general overview of typical organic compounds such as alcohols, ketones and amino acids, as well as a presentation of important biological compounds and processes that are of particular importance in the life sciences. Lab work will provide an opportunity to observe physical and chemical behavior of these compounds and processes.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CHE 1020 - Introductory Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the concepts, principles and applications of chemistry. Includes atomic structure, periodicity, structure of matter, solutions, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Includes lab sessions which will illustrate the principles of quantitative interpretation of data. Prior learning in    is strongly recommended.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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Communication

  
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    COM 1015 - Communication in the Early Childhood Education & Afterschool Workplace

    Credits: 3
    Students develop effective communication and relationship-building skills for use in the early childhood education and afterschool workplace through practical activities and exercises. The course focuses on communication skills with parents, colleagues, supervisors, and children and youth from infant to teens. Emphasis will be placed on active listening, observation, self-reflective responses, and the use of clear language in interpersonal and small group situations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 2360 - Conflict Resolution

    Credits: 3
    Students will explore the scope and nature of, and become acquainted with, methods of conflict resolution and nonviolent change at various levels. Focuses on active listening and oral communication skills, principled negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and nonviolent direct action. Students also examine their own personal communication styles with regard to conflict.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 2070 - Effective Presentations

    Credits: 1
    Focuses on presenting ideas, proposals, and reports on technical and nontechnical topics. Topics include: structuring presentations for different purposes, strategies for persuading people in authority to support one’s position, the effects of nonverbal communication, and ways to develop and incorporate visual aids.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1010 - Effective Workplace Communication

    Credits: 3
    Students develop effective communication skills for use in workplace settings through practical activities and exercises. Focuses on communication with co-workers, supervisors, and customers. Students learn to organize and express ideas, deliver oral presentations to different audiences, and work with others to make decisions and solve problems. Examines the role each individual plays in the effectiveness of an organization and the importance of communication for individual professional development.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1030 - Intercultural Communication

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the role that culture plays in the human communication process. Students will examine the various dimensions of communication in a culturally diverse society, including those in interpersonal, small group, organizational and mass media. Students will explore both the theories of intercultural communication and the verbal and nonverbal applications associated with becoming a competent and effective communicator.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1020 - Interpersonal & Small Group Communication

    Credits: 3
    Theories of effective communication will be examined and practically applied. Emphasis will be placed on active listening, observation, reflective responses, and the use of clear language in interpersonal and small group situations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1220 - Introduction to Mass Communication

    Credits: 3
    Mass media has become the primary force in shaping our historical, political and social reality. The course introduces students to the study of the mass communication process and media literacy practices. Students will explore theoretical approaches to mass communication in the contexts and concerns of society, government and commerce. Historical development, functions and technological developments and subsequent cultural, political and economic implications will be examined.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1050 - Introduction to Popular Culture

    Credits: 3
    This interdisciplinary theory course explores the ways in which media and the entertainment industries have made consumerism the focal point of American culture and society. Focusing primarily on the marketing and consumption of clothing, food, toys and religion, we will examine how the commercialization and privatization of popular culture have forced us to revise how we think of ourselves as individuals and as a nation.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1045 - Introduction to Visual Communication

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the concepts of visual literacy and visual rhetoric and explores how photographs, films, cartoons, T-shirts, ads, works of art and all things visible have the capacity to create meaning, provoke response and communicate implied or overt messages. Students will be exposed to a wide range of visual media as they learn to critically “read” visual texts as narrative and argument within particular contexts. They will apply visual comprehension skills in analyzing the power, scope and social significance of the visual world and apply their understanding of the composition and production of effective images and symbols in creating and manipulating their own visual messages.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 2010 - Principles of Persuasion

    Credits: 3
    Examines public speaking, group discussion, and debate as methods of communication and as tools for decision-making. Students participate in speaking and writing exercises designed to further their understanding of the communication process. Issues such as freedom of speech and ethics in discourse are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1070 - Social Media & Communication

    Credits: 3
    This course will examine how the growth of social media has transformed the landscape of contemporary communication. Students will acquire skills to effectively navigate and manipulate this virtual world and reflect upon the role it plays in shaping public discourse and social exchange. Students will analyze how new media technology has changed the way individuals and groups interact, how messages are produced and consumed, and how language itself is utilized. Through practical application, students will explore how the roles and strategies of media professionals and marketers have evolved with regard to how information is collected and shared and in reaching target audiences.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 1180 - Storytelling through Media

    Credits: 3
    This course investigates the essence and power of storytelling, revealing how narrative can be effectively applied in a range of contexts and across multiple media platforms to achieve specific goals for businesses and organizations. Students explore the opportunities and perils of storytelling with regard to audience engagement, branding and successful marketing, and apply their learning to demonstrate proficiency in developing their own stories and selecting appropriate media technology and delivery strategies to convey these.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    COM 2060 - Strategies to Improve Workplace Communication

    Credits: 1
    Addresses some of the key ingredients for improving communications in organizations. Participants learn how to set priorities, improve communication effectiveness, build rapport, and handle conflict through better communication inside and outside the group environment.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 2031 - C/C++ Programming I

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to computer programming and problem-solving techniques using the C and C++ programming languages. Students will learn fundamental programming concepts including if/then constructs, loops, input and output methods, subroutines and variable definition.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2032 - C/C++ Programming II

    Credits: 3
    Students will learn computer programming using the structured programming language C and its object-oriented derivative C++. Language concepts will include variables, data structures, pointers, conditional and looping constructs, functions, objects, properties and methods. Specific object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts such as encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism will be explained. Emphasis will be placed on solving problems using well written algorithms, producing readable program documentation and creating programs that are user friendly and produce neat, attractive output.

    Prerequisites:   or   


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    CIS 1311 - Cisco I: Introduction to Networks

    Credits: 4
    This course, the first of four Cisco Networking Academy courses, introduces students to the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Students will build simple local area networks (LANs), perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes.

    Prerequisites:   or equivalent


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    CIS 1312 - Cisco II: Routing & Switching Essentials

    Credits: 4
    This course, the second of four Cisco Networking Academy courses, addresses the architecture, components, and operation of routers and switches in a small network. Students will learn to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches, and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician (CCENT) industry certification exam.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CIS 1313 - Cisco III: Scaling Networks

    Credits: 4
    This course, the third of four Cisco Networking Academy courses, addresses architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students will learn to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches for advanced functionality and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 1314 - Cisco IV: Connecting Networks

    Credits: 4
    This course, the last of four Cisco Networking Academy courses, covers WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. Students will learn selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Topics include how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) industry certification exam.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 1020 - Computer Essentials

    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to computer skills necessary for success in computer coursework and the workplace setting. General features of file management, word processing, and basic presentation software will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on using a network, including e-mail, the Internet, and a learning management system. Students will also develop keyboarding skills. This course counts as credit for a CCV degree but does not satisfy the technological literacy requirement.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2360 - Computer User Support

    Credits: 3
    This course will provide students with help-desk-specific skills. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of help desk communication techniques and customer service, and focus on the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to prepare for entry-level positions in computer user support. Students will work with real world computer support examples, case studies, and activities.

    Prerequisites:    and   


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    CIS 2120 - Concepts of Local Area Networks

    Credits: 3
    This course covers the basic networking concepts found on the CompTIA Network+ certification. Concepts include network operating systems, hardware, and troubleshooting techniques and the role, setup and administration of Local Area Networks.

    Prerequisites:  ,  


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    CIS 2110 - Concepts of PC Hardware

    Credits: 4
    This course covers the hardware concepts found on the CompTIA A+ certification exam. In this course, students will learn how to purchase, upgrade, and maintain personal computer hardware and software. In addition to hands on experience, emphasis is placed on research and planning related to application and utility software and hardware purchases. Students will select and purchase the components necessary to build or upgrade a functioning computer and should anticipate expenses beyond the tuition for the course.

    Prerequisites: 6 credits of CIS coursework above  


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    CIS 1360 - Database Management Systems

    Credits: 3
    This course provides a comprehensive examination of database management software. Students will learn database principles and apply them to developing relational databases and generating simple and complex reports. Emphasis is on the application of database management to work related problems.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 2190 - Decision Making through Business Intelligence

    Credits: 3
    Business intelligence uses technologies, processes, and applications to support better business decision-making. Topics include computer-based techniques used to identify, extract, and analyze business data, such as sales revenue by products and/or departments, or by associated costs and incomes. Special emphasis will be placed on the application of business intelligence technologies to historical, current, and predictive views of business operations. Students will be introduced to common functions of business intelligence technologies such as reporting, online analytical processing, analytics, data mining, process mining, benchmarking, text mining, and predictive analytics.

    Prerequisites:   and  


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    CIS 1350 - Desktop Operating Systems

    Credits: 4
    This course covers the concepts of Microsoft Windows operating systems found on the CompTIA A+ certification exam. Students will learn how to install, configure, and troubleshoot computer operating systems.

    Prerequisites: 6 credits of CIS coursework above  


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    CIS 2410 - Digital Image Manipulation

    Credits: 3
    Students will learn the properties of various digital image files and their use in both Internet and print applications. Using an industry standard image editing program, students will learn how to select, modify, adjust, combine and manipulate digital images for the Internet and print applications. The technical and creative aspects of image manipulation will be covered, as well as image file types such as .jpg, .gif, .png, and .tif. Copyright issues, ethical usage of images on the web, and explanation of the different resolution requirements between web and print images will also be discussed.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 1801 - Digital Marketing Internship I

    Credits: 3
    This course connects classroom learning to experience in a workplace setting. Students will design a field study that meets their personal and professional goals. The classroom component may include critical analysis and reflection on an occupation, service to the community, exploration of the roles and responsibilities of citizens, and making connections between learning and the field study. The course consists of at least 15 hours of class time and 80 – 90 hours in the field.

    Prerequisites:   and  


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    CIS 2080 - Foundations of Content Management Systems

    Credits: 3
    This course explores the development of websites through content management systems such as WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal. Students will learn to import and create documents and multimedia material, create landing pages, build Google analytics, and track and manage multiple versions of content. Topics include identification and assignment of key users and their roles, definition of workflow tasks coupled with messaging to alert content managers to changes in content, and publication of content to a repository to support access to the content.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 2272 - Intermediate Java Programming

    Credits: 3
    This course investigates more advanced features of the Java programming language, including networking, security, graphics, and multithreading.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CIS 2152 - Intermediate Linux

    Credits: 3
    This course covers the setup and administration of the Linux operating system in small-to-medium sized businesses including its use as a mail server, web server, database server, and file and print server.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CIS 2440 - Intermediate Website Development

    Credits: 3
    This course covers advanced topics in HTML and web design including server-side includes, cascading style sheets, and dynamic HTML. In addition, students will be introduced to extensible markup language (XML) and learn to incorporate XML documents into web pages.

    Prerequisites:  ,   


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    CIS 1100 - Introduction to Computer Science

    Credits: 3


     

     

    This course is designed to give a broad-based introduction to all aspects of computing. Students will focus on core aspects of the discipline including hardware, networking, the Internet, programming logic, ethics, and the history and future of industry. The goal of this course is to give students a working knowledge of the computer industry and provide a solid foundation of knowledge to begin technical training.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 1510 - Introduction to Flash Animation

    Credits: 3
    This course is a hands-on introduction to creating Flash animations for Web pages. Students will gain proficiency with Flash illustration and animation concepts, and learn how to set up the program interface, access documentation, import images and sounds. Students will also learn the correct usage of frame actions, user controls, GoTo structures, and MovieClip structures, and have an introduction to ActionScript.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 1150 - Introduction to Internet Marketing

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of the business value of Internet marketing and ways it can be used to attract, convert, and retain online customers. Students will be introduced to the broad array of interactive marketing programs used to achieve business goals including search marketing, display advertising, email marketing, site optimization, social media, mobile marketing, and online analytics. Students will learn the key differences between Internet marketing and traditional marketing and the advantages and disadvantages of both. Topics include the critical metrics used to assess and improve marketing campaigns, including methodologies for tracking the impact of online channels such as e-mail, paid search (pay-per-click), organic search (higher page ranking in search engines), and display / banner ads.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2150 - Introduction to Linux

    Credits: 3
    This course covers the Linux operating system providing an introduction to the installation, configuration and troubleshooting of this popular operating system. Also covers the free software or open source software movement in general, where to find packages, how to install them, and how to get support.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 1045 - Introduction to Multimedia Applications & Tools

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the many applications that enhance the world of multimedia and the web, as well as the technological decisions that are needed to deploy them. Students will learn how various tools are used to create a rich, dynamic audio/visual experience for users in many different formats. Emphasis is given to understanding current, new and emerging technologies and the impact they have on web-based media. Students enrolling in the course should have basic computer skills.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 1040 - Introduction to Spreadsheets

    Credits: 1
    A hands-on introduction to electronic spreadsheets. Students will learn to build spreadsheets using formulas, functions and formatting options. Students will learn to create graphs and charts and to save, print and retrieve their work. This course is identical in content to the spreadsheet unit of Microcomputer Applications I.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 1170 - Introduction to Web Analytics

    Credits: 3
    In this course students will explore the key concepts, diagnostic approaches, techniques and practices of web analytics used to achieve greater return on investment through online marketing initiatives. Drawing from case studies and practical application, students will learn how web analytics can drive higher profits and improve the customer experience. The course will include an overview of technologies such as ad-servers, rich media, bid-management systems, and online research tools with an emphasis on tracking and reporting of web site activity and campaign measurement and testing.

    Prerequisites:   or  


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    CIS 2271 - Java Programming

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the Java language and the way it implements object-oriented programming. Students will learn fundamental programming concepts including if/then constructs, loops, input and output methods, subroutines, and variable definition.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2040 - Management Information Systems

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the nature and scope of information systems in the business environment. Provides an understanding of the purposes and development of data and information systems for organizational management. A case study approach is used in applying basic principles of system design.

    Prerequisites: 6 credits of CIS coursework above  


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    CIS 1041 - Microcomputer Applications I

    Credits: 3
    A hands-on introduction to information processing using operating system and application software designed for microcomputers. Covers file management, presentation graphics, word processing, and spreadsheets. Basic algebra skills are required.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2310 - Novell Networking

    Credits: 3
    This course covers the Novell Identity Management system, providing an introduction to the installation, configuration, and security of this popular networking system. Also covers eDirectory installation and configuration and ZENworks Desktop Management. Recommended prior learning: network and operating systems experience

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2140 - Programming for the Internet

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to client-side programming for the World Wide Web, using the JavaScript language. After learning the basic syntax and structures, students use JavaScript to add dynamic, interactive elements to web pages. In addition, students will use JavaScript and the Document Object Model to perform various tasks including checking HTML form data prior to processing at the web server.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 2210 - Python Programming

    Credits: 3


     

     

    This course is an introduction to programming using Python. Students will explore a wide variety of Python application domains including web and network programming, game development, scientific and numerical applications, textual analysis, system administration, and software development support. Topics include fundamental programming concepts, Python syntax, the standard libraries, and object-oriented programming. Emphasis will be placed on solving problems in a variety of domains using well-written Python programs. Basic algebra skills are recommended.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 2180 - Search Engine Marketing & Optimization

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to the technologies, techniques, and strategies required to achieve high rankings on search engines. Students will learn how to select the best search engine marketing method and create an effective search engine marketing campaign to achieve promotional goals. The main search engines such as Google, Yahoo, and Bing will be addressed. Search engine optimization provides a means to maximize web site traffic by optimizing the visitor experience at the web site. Students will learn organic search engine optimization practices and pay-per-click approaches as well as the ability to compare and contrast these strategies. Through case studies and practical application, students will learn to define, track, evaluate, and optimize web sites to improve visitor conversion goals. Students will be introduced to topics such as information architecture and navigation, content structure, internal page and link strategy, and the optimization of internal web site search engines.

    Prerequisites:  


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    CIS 2340 - SQL Database Administration

    Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to the Structured Query Language (SQL) used in many database products, and how to design, create, and maintain tables, indexes, and queries on a SQL compliant database server. Also covered are SQL security options, data normalization and performance improvement using indexes and stored procedures, and connecting to SQL compliant servers using Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) from database front end products such as Microsoft Access and Microsoft Query.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CIS 2170 - Web Analytics Strategies & Processes

    Credits: 3


    This course builds on the skills learned in Introduction to Web Analytics and addresses both the art and science of successfully using web analytics to drive change within organizations. Getting organizational buy-in for analytics usage and data-driven decision making, choosing and deploying the right solutions to meet business needs, staffing and training the organization properly, and communicating information to diverse constituents within the organization are all key to success for the web analytics administrator. The course covers successful web analytics management strategies and processes within the organization, providing both the knowledge and practical skills for successful implementation of web analytics tools.

     

    Prerequisites:

     


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    CIS 2430 - Web Application Programming

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to server-side scripting technologies for web development. These include CGI/Perl, PHP and at least one of the following: Active Server Pages, and/or Java Server Pages. Following an introduction to the selected scripting language, students will create scripts to generate dynamic web pages and to perform common server-side processing functions such as HTML forms and database processing.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CIS 1151 - Website Development

    Credits: 3
    This course includes an introduction to web pages for websites: use of and design with HyperText Markup Language, text and graphics; applying appropriate design, color, and art; size and place graphics, including imagemaps, in a web page; creation of advanced tables, including nested tables; creation of forms that contain advanced input types and attributes, text areas, and advanced lists; use of a validation tool to debug an HTML document.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CIS 1322 - Word Processing

    Credits: 3
    This course is a comprehensive examination of the full set of word processing features. Topics covered include basic through advanced editing techniques, formatting, tables, creation of databases, mail merge, creation and use of macros to facilitate program use, and referencing tools.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 2020 - American Judicial Process

    Credits: 3
    Provides students with an overview of the American judicial process, examining its history, structure, and operation. Topics considered include court organization and administration, the courtroom work group, the trial and appellate processes, problems that plague the courts, and alternatives to courts for conflict resolution.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CRJ 2150 - Community & Restorative Justice

    Credits: 3
    This course provides students with an understanding of community and restorative justice principles and values, and helps them to develop skills and knowledge related to current restorative justice practices in Vermont. Topics include the evolution of models of justice, differences between retributive and restorative justice, reparative probation boards and real justice conferences, and restorative models and practices that involve victims, communities and offenders as active partners.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 2510 - Criminal Law

    Credits: 3
    An examination of the evolution and development of substantive criminal law. Topics examined include: common law vs. statutory crimes; elements of a crime; parties to a crime; criminal responsibility; and defenses to criminal culpability. Selected portions of the Vermont criminal code are also examined.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CRJ 2050 - Criminology

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the nature and causation of crime. Students explore the theories of criminal behavior and the factors which affect crime distribution and displacement. The course introduces students to research methods used in analyzing crime typologies and measuring criminal behavior.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 2070 - Forensics & Crime Scene Investigation

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the principles of forensics and crime scene investigation with a focus on procedures specific to various crimes. Students use forensic science techniques to recognize, collect and evaluate the importance of physical evidence discovered at the crime scene. Crime scene sketching, photography, and searches will be covered, as well as court room evidence presentation methods.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    Credits: 3
    An overview of the American criminal justice system, tracing its history, philosophy, and practices and assessing its strengths and weaknesses. The components of the system’s enforcement agencies, courts, and corrections institutions are examined.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 2130 - Introduction to Intelligence Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Provides an overview of intelligence analysis in criminal, counter-terrorism, and emergency management contexts. Topics include an introduction to intelligence analysis methods and the prediction for future criminal behavior based on analysis and data. Report writing and presentations will be included.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 2160 - Juvenile Justice

    Credits: 3
    Presents an overview of the history, control, treatment and prevention of juvenile delinquency in the United States. Examines the juvenile justice system, juvenile law, and theories of causation for delinquent behavior. Analyzes influences of the family, peers, school, drugs, mass media, and the criminal justice system on delinquency. Focuses on Vermont juvenile law and procedure, including Children in Need of Supervision (C.H.I.N.S.) cases and relevant case law.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 2010 - Law Enforcement in America

    Credits: 3
    The roles and responsibilities of American law enforcement. Examines the discretionary powers, limitations and behaviors of police officers in relation to the operational policy and administration of police agencies.

    Prerequisites:   


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    CRJ 2090 - Transportation and Border Security

    Credits: 3
    This course examines transportation and border security and vulnerabilities within the transportation system. The roles of local, federal, and international law enforcement agencies will be explored in the context of border security.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    CRJ 2030 - Victimology

    Credits: 3
    A study of victimization. Examines the factors which contribute to victimization, the concepts of shared responsibility and the relationships between victims and offenders. Surveys the programs, laws and efforts designed to assist victims.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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Dance

  
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    DAN 1060 - African & Caribbean Dance & Culture

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to African and Caribbean dance techniques, aesthetics, theory, and context. Students will practice movement through exercises, sequences and complete dances, and apply harmonious body mechanics, proper use of breath, strength, flexibility, grounding, and centering. The origins and mythological nature of African and Caribbean dances as a personal and community dance form will be explored through readings and discussion.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    DAN 1030 - Body Awareness

    Credits: 3
    Develops the posture and movement of the body through examination and practice of a variety of body awareness techniques. Emphasis is on the importance of proper alignment, energy flow, flexibility and strength, body/breath coordination and tension-relief exercises.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    DAN 1020 - Fundamentals of Jazz Dance

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to jazz dance techniques, aesthetics, and theory through studying a variety of styles including African, Latin, and hip-hop. Students explore movement through dance exercises, learn movement sequences, and practice exercises in choreography. Traces the themes, history, and practice of jazz dance as an art form.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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    DAN 2210 - Middle Eastern Dance & Culture

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to Middle Eastern dance techniques, aesthetics, theory and cultural context. Students will study beginning movement vocabulary and practice through exercises and choreographic sequences. The origins, development, symbolism, and cultural significance of Middle Eastern dance will be examined through lecture, discussions, readings, presentations, videos, and a field trip, if possible.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


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Developmental Skills

  
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    DEV 0190 - Basic Algebra Brush-Up

    Credits: 0
    This workshop is for students who are ready for Mathematical Concepts or College Algebra but would benefit from a quick brush-up in basic algebra skills. The workshop includes a brief review of algebraic laws, polynomials, exponents, linear equations, and factoring. Free to CCV students enrolled in credit-bearing courses.


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    DEV 0260 - Basic Chemistry Workshop

    Credits: 0
    A two-session workshop. The first session will be an intensive overview of the periodic table; chemical symbols; atomic structure of the elements; the differences between elements, molecules, compounds and ions; the peculiarities of water; and a brief discussion of the gas laws. The second session will cover definitions of salts, acids/bases and the origin of pH and an introduction to the most commonly known organic compounds important to the body: carbohydrates, fats, and both structural and nutritional proteins.


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    DEV 0180 - Basic Math Brush-Up

    Credits: 0
    This workshop is for students who are ready for Basic Algebra but would benefit from a quick brush-up on basic math skills. The workshop includes a brief review of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios, percentages, positive and negative numbers, and basic arithmetic operations. Free to CCV students enrolled in credit-bearing courses.


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    DEV 0172 - Basic Mathematics Refresher

    Credits: 0
    For students whose Arithmetic Accuplacer assessment score is close to the level necessary to start Basic Algebra, this workshop will afford them the opportunity to review and reinforce math concepts, ideally raising their skills to the level where they can bypass the Basic Math course. Emphasis will be placed on working with fractions, percentages, and proportions. Familiarization with Accuplacer format and subject areas will be included.


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