Apr 04, 2020  
Catalog 2014-2015 
    
Catalog 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


The courses listed in this Catalog are all the courses that CCV has approved for the 2014-15 academic year. Though approved, some of these courses may not be offered during the ‘14-‘15 academic year. Several months before the start of each semester, CCV publishes a Schedule that indicates what courses are available in particular locations and the exact times and dates for that semester.

NOTE ON PREREQUISITES: Because basic academic skills (reading, writing, math) are prerequisites for CCV college-level courses, they are not always listed in each course’s description.

View Essential Learning Objectives

 

Film Studies

  
  •  

    FLM 1060 - The Documentary Film

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the art of documentary filmmaking and the role of documentary films in exploring current social issues and the means by which film can be used to affect public opinion and social policy. The language and techniques of film, propaganda and fairness, theme and point of view will be examined as the class views and critiques a number of films.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


French

  
  •  

    FRE 1111 - French I

    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the French language and covers basic grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. It includes simple conversation, reading, and writing exercises and provides an introduction to the arts and cultures of France and French-speaking peoples.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    FRE 1112 - French II

    Credits: 3
    This course involves further study of the elements of the French language. Focus will include review and development of vocabulary and grammar leading to more advanced usage. It provides increased practice in conversation, written expression, interpretation of selected readings, and further study of elements of the arts and cultures of France and French-speaking peoples.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings


Geography

  
  •  

    GEO 2230 - Globalization in the Modern World

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the connections and interdependence between our own lives and those of other people in the world. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course seeks to understand what globalization really means and how it has come to be an important influence on our daily lives.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    GEO 1010 - Introduction to Geography

    Credits: 3
    This introductory course examines the four traditions of geography: the earth science tradition, the culture-environment tradition, the locational tradition, and the area analysis tradition. Topics include landforms, weather and climate, the human impact on the environment, world cultures, populations, spatial interactions, political geography, economic geography, and urban geography.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    GEO 2020 - World Regions & Cultures

    Credits: 3
    Introduces students to major regions and countries of the world. The role of culture, history, and environment in current world affairs will be explored. World regional issues are examined in the context of globalization and the economic and cultural connections between people and nations.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Geology

  
  •  

    GEY 1030 - Dynamic Earth: Introduction to Physical Geology

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the minerals and rocks that make up the Earth, and the surface and internal geologic processes that shape their arrangement and distribution. Topics to be covered include mineral and rock composition, the surface processes of weathering, erosion and deposition, plate tectonics theory, the Earth’s internal structure, and the nature of geologic time. Includes a lab.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


German

  
  •  

    GER 1111 - German I

    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the German language and covers basic grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. It includes simple conversation, reading and writing exercises and provides an introduction to the arts and cultures of Germany and German-speaking peoples.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    GER 1112 - German II

    Credits: 3
    This course involves further study of the elements of the German language. Focus will include review and development of vocabulary and grammar leading to more advanced usage. It provides increased practice in conversation, written expression, interpretation of selected readings, and further study of elements of the arts and cultures of Germany and German-speaking peoples.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings


History

  
  •  

    HIS 2130 - African American History

    Credits: 3
    A survey of African-American culture, social and political developments in the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean as they have shaped African-American history. Course will consider American history from the perspective of slaves and free blacks from the arrival of Africans in the Americas through Black nationalism, Civil Rights Movements and legislation.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1211 - American History I

    Credits: 3
    A survey of the major events in United States history from colonial days to the time of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students will examine forces behind these events and their social, economic, and political implications for the development of society in the United States.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1212 - American History II

    Credits: 3
    Beginning with Reconstruction, students will trace the social, economic, political, and cultural forces that have shaped the history of the United States to the present day. Emphasizes understanding of contemporary issues in light of our past.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2560 - History of Homosexuality in Western Civilization

    Credits: 3
    A survey of the attitudes of various societies toward homosexuals and homosexuality from the beginnings of Western civilization to contemporary times. Students will increase their understanding of homosexuality in various societies and their awareness of the contributions of gay men and women to the development of our culture.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2220 - History of the American West

    Credits: 3
    This course is a survey of the trans-Mississippian West covering social, political, intellectual, and environmental history. The course will include the study of the American West and its peoples from 1450 through the 20th century. Some emphasis will be placed on contrasting the “mythical” West with historical facts.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2420 - Latin American History & Culture

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to Latin American history, this course will consider historical events in the Americas from the wars for independence to the present and explore the changing relationships of these new countries with Europe and the United States. This course will consider regional geography, culture, economics, and sociology and will include an in-depth investigation of five countries as chosen by the teacher.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2250 - Modern Middle Eastern History

    Credits: 3
    This is a political, social, cultural, and economic study of the modern Middle East, focusing on the 20th century. Students explore Middle Eastern religious traditions, interactions between Middle Eastern and Western cultures, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the resurgence of Islamic politics, and nationalism, rebellion, and terrorism in the region.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2230 - Modern Russian History

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, the formation and consolidation of the Soviet state, its decline and collapse, and the establishment of the Russian Federation.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1220 - Native American Histories & Cultures

    Credits: 3
    An interdisciplinary course exploring indigenous cultures of North America. Students will consider the pre-Columbian world, history of contacts between Indians and settlers, and contemporary issues including legal sovereignty, land claim, resource policy, poverty, and cultural autonomy.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2730 - Peace & Turmoil in the Modern World

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the successes and failures of peace by identifying how and why wars have begun, considering the cultural environment of various wars, and through studying the roles individuals, organizations, and nations play in creating conditions for war and peace.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2270 - Society & Environment in History

    Credits: 3
    An exploration of the response to environmental challenges by various societies in history and why societies fail and perish, or succeed and survive.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1240 - The American Revolution

    Credits: 3
    Explores the political, social, and economic events of Colonial America. Covers topics such as significant British and American figures and American attitudes to the Revolutionary War. Includes extensive use of primary source documents.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2140 - The Civil War

    Credits: 3
    Explores the causes and effects of the Civil War, focusing on issues important both then and now such as states’ rights, the treatment of blacks and minorities, a political Supreme Court, and reactions to war.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2150 - The United States in the 1960s

    Credits: 3
    An interdisciplinary examination of culture and society in the United States during a turbulent, eventful decade in its history. Topics to be studied include the Great Society, the Civil Rights Movement, the war in Vietnam, the Women’s Movement, and popular culture. Students will develop skills in analyzing social movements, political conflicts, mass media, and issues of gender, class, and race as a means of studying history.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2110 - United States History 1945 to Present

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the major political events and social issues in the United States between World War II and the present. Topics will include the Korean War, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam, Women’s Movement, Watergate, mass media and pop culture, and the conservative resurgence.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2070 - Vermont History

    Credits: 3
    Surveys the history of Vermont from early days to the present. Students explore political, social, cultural, and economic aspects of the history of the state.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1011 - Western Civilization I

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the foundations of Western civilization up to the time of the formation of modern nation states. Students will study major events in Western civilization, together with social, political, and economic forces associated with them.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1012 - Western Civilization II

    Credits: 3
    Beginning with the early modern period in Europe, students study the events and forces shaping modern Western civilization: industrialization, urbanization, world politics, changing social awareness and the rise of competing economic and political systems.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 2210 - Women in United States History

    Credits: 3
    Examines the experience of women in United States history and the evolving role of women in U.S. society and culture, from the colonial era to the present.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1111 - World History I

    Credits: 3
    This survey course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social developments in world history from the rise of civilization to 1500 CE in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. The course highlights geography, cultural and political movements, and human interactions that influenced the historical evolution of various world societies and their interrelationships within a global context.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HIS 1112 - World History II

    Credits: 3
    The continuing development of the world’s major civilizations: European/American, South Asian (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh), East Asian (China, Korea, Japan), African, and Islamic from the time of European global expansion to the present with particular attention to the problems and challenges of globalization.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Hospitality & Tourism Management

  
  •  

    HTM 2030 - Adventure Travel & Recreation Planning

    Credits: 3
    Explores all aspects of expedition planning for adventure travel and analyzes the adventure travel industry business. Topics include expedition planning, destination development, group dynamics, accessible adventure travel, practical outdoor leadership, legal issues, and activity and risk management.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HTM 1030 - Introduction to Hospitality, Tourism & Travel

    Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of the hospitality management industry including lodging, food service, special event management, international travel, resort management, and adventure travel. Students will examine guest service, management, and marketing practices within each sector, and will analyze the economic, cultural, and social impacts of the hospitality industry. Students will also explore career opportunities within hospitality sectors.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HTM 1040 - Introduction to Lodging & Resort Management

    Credits: 3
    Introduces students to the process of managing and operating hotels, resorts, and small properties. Students gain a working knowledge of lodging and resort management principles, strategies and policies, and analyze their effectiveness. Topics include property management, foods purchasing and distribution, environmental impact, and planning and for financial and human resource factors.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HTM 2040 - Special Event & Tour Management

    Credits: 3
    Explores the principles of programming and managing special events and tours for diverse populations. Topics include planning, marketing, sponsorship, and budgeting for the managerial and operations aspects of an event, tour and conference.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HTM 2060 - Special Event Management: Weddings, Festivals & Conferences

    Credits: 3


     

     

    This course focuses on the management of special events including weddings, festivals, and conferences. Topics include planning, budgeting, staffing, technology, and logistics for the most popular types of events in the hospitality industry.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HTM 2080 - The Business of Leisure: Hospitality & Tourism

    Credits: 3
    This capstone course requires students to apply their theoretical and practical knowledge of hospitality management. Through case studies, scenarios, and a final project, students will demonstrate critical understanding of principles of decision making, guest services, management, human resources, marketing, and sales in the hospitality industry.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Humanities

  
  •  

    HUM 2030 - American Folklore

    Credits: 3
    An exploration of how the traditional and popular beliefs and practices of North American cultures have developed over time and what their interpretation reveals about social identity, relationships, and change. Studies verbal, material, musical, and ritual folkways as expressive and artistic forms in everyday life.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2020 - Bioethics

    Credits: 3
    This course explores ethical issues and decision-making processes involved in biomedical research and practice as viewed from legal, medical, social, and philosophical perspectives. Students will apply philosophical frameworks, theoretical approaches, argument development skills, and critical thinking to address moral questions pertaining to the beginning and end of life, biotechnology and genetic experimentation, justice in healthcare, responsibilities of physicians, environmental health, and other pertinent subjects.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2150 - Ireland through Words, Images & Music

    Credits: 3
    An interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Ireland, this course explores the relationship between Irish experience and the representation of Irish life exported in the country’s writing, cinema, and music. Students will read works by major Irish writers and view adaptations of Irish literature in film. Set against a backdrop of Irish music, traditional and modern, students will explore Ireland’s history and changing culture.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2140 - Latin America in Literature, Film & Music

    Credits: 3
    An interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America, this course explores the relationship between Latin American experience and its representation as expressed in the region’s writing, cinema, and music. Students will examine literature and films by major Latin American artists and become familiar with a range of traditional and modern Latin American music while learning how these arts have been influenced by the history and changing cultures of Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Latin North America.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2010 - Seminar in Educational Inquiry

    Credits: 3
    Inquiry is the foundation for this interdisciplinary capstone course. It provides a forum for critical thinking about substantive issues, problems, and themes that affect the world, our society, our communities, and our selves. Throughout the semester, students will be challenged to ask critical questions, evaluate evidence, create connections, and present ideas in writing. This process prepares students for developing and presenting a culminating thesis through which they demonstrate proficiency in the graduation standards of writing and information literacy. Because the final paper is essential in demonstrating this proficiency, students must complete the final paper with a grade of C- or better in order to pass the course. This course is required for students planning to graduate and should be taken within the year prior to graduation once all competency area requirements have been satisfied. Seminar in Educational Inquiry does not meet the Human Expression general education requirement.

    Prerequisites:   and a Research & Writing Intensive course, or equivalent skills


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2040 - The Holocaust

    Credits: 3
    An exploration of the Holocaust from historical, political, moral, and religious perspectives. Students use historical documents, film, literature, and art to explore various dimensions of this watershed event in Western civilization.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2120 - The Power of Food in Literature, Culture & Film

    Credits: 3
    In this interdisciplinary course, students will explore the power and meaning of food and how it is contextualized within the broader aspects of culture and human experience as revealed and expressed in literature and film. Although food plays a fundamental role in survival, it is also at the heart of shared and ritualized eating practices–from simple to ceremonial–that shape identity and define notions of community. Through interpreting short fiction, novels, poems, essays and select films, students will explore the cultural and social significance of food in a range of world cultures, the role of food as a literary or cinematic device, and the metaphoric quality of food as it expresses human desire and behavior.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2070 - The Vampire in Literature, Culture & Film

    Credits: 3
    In this course, students will examine the role of the vampire in literature, film and popular culture. More than any other archetypal figure, American popular culture is infused with images of the vampire. This course explores the origins of the vampire myth, its transformation into literary legend, its cultural and social significance, and its inception in literature, film, advertisements, television and music, as well as its broader cultural significance in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2110 - Vietnam War in Literature & Film

    Credits: 3
    This course looks at the Vietnam war era from a variety of perspectives, examining the conflict through the literature and film of the cultures involved: Vietnamese, American, and French. This course also explores the larger genre of war literature, comprised of classics like the Iliad and Beowulf, and the particular questions, issues, and values raised by such an exploration.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 2050 - Women’s Spirituality

    Credits: 3
    This course will examine current thought on women’s theology and compare it to traditional theological paradigms. Ancient and modern expressions of women’s religious and spiritual experience, women authors whose works deal with the spiritual life, and basic instruction in feminist readings will be included.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    HUM 1240 - World of Comedy & Humor

    Credits: 3
    What makes us laugh? This interdisciplinary course explores the nature and role of humor across cultures and many of the forms it has taken throughout history. Examples of comic styles and devices will be critically analyzed in a range of social and performative contexts. Theories of humor will be examined to illuminate how, through generating laughter and expressing emotions and ideas that are often socially suppressed, humor can be effective in entertaining, persuading, communicating social commentary, and even in healing.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Interdisciplinary Studies

  
  •  

    INT 1015 - Combat to Classroom

    Credits: 1


     

     

    This course explores the differences between military and college cultures. Students will gain skills to ease their successful transition to college. Students will learn to navigate and access services designed to support success. This course is intended for student veterans or military service members entering college for the first time or for the first time in many years.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    INT 1060 - Dimensions of Freedom

    Credits: 3
    In this first-semester seminar, students read, discuss, and think critically about written and visual texts in literature, philosophy, and history. Beginning with the self and then drawing upon others’ experiences, knowledge, and representations of the world, students develop and apply 21st-century skills necessary for lifelong learning and active participation in a diverse community. Central to the course is developing an understanding of academic freedom and responsibility.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    INT 1050 - Dimensions of Work

    Credits: 3
    In this first-semester seminar, students read, discuss, and think critically about written and visual texts in biography, history, and the social sciences. Beginning with the self and then drawing upon others’ experiences, knowledge, and representations of the world, students develop and apply 21st-century skills necessary for lifelong learning and active participation in a diverse community. Central to the course is developing an understanding of academic freedom and responsibility.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    INT 0050 - Reading & Writing for College

    Credits: 3
    In this course, students strengthen the critical reading, and writing and communication skills that are essential to completing college-level courses, including Dimensions of Freedom and Dimensions of Work.During the semester, students work closely on readings and assignments associated with the Dimensions course, and build foundational academic skills, utilize available resources, and work on develop strategies and behaviors associated with successful college learning. Students must be co-enrolled in a Dimensions course in order to register for this course. The credits earned in this course do not apply toward the associate degree, but students who are successful in the Dimensions course will earn 3 college-level credits for that course and meet one of their requirements for graduation.

    Corequisites:   or  


    Click here for course offerings


Italian

  
  •  

    ITA 1011 - Italian I

    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the Italian language and covers basic grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. It includes simple conversation, reading, and writing exercises and provides an introduction to the arts and cultures of Italy and Italian-speaking peoples.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    ITA 1012 - Italian II

    Credits: 3
    This course includes further study of the elements of the Italian language. Focus will include review and development of vocabulary and grammar leading to more advanced usage. It provides increased practice in conversation, written expression, interpretation of selected readings, and further study of elements of the arts and cultures of Italy and Italian-speaking peoples.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings


Mathematics

  
  •  

    MAT 1030 - Applied Math Concepts

    Credits: 3


    This course develops students’ ability to think quantitatively and use mathematics as a problem-solving tool in their professional and personal lives. Mathematical applications are selected from a range of business, human services, health, and political topics. Concepts include set theory, visual representation of data, operations in the real number system, geometry, linear and nonlinear equations, linear systems, personal finance, probability, and statistics. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

     

     

    Prerequisites:

      or equivalent


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 0221 - Basic Algebra

    Credits: 3
    A beginning course in algebra. Includes algebraic laws, polynomials, exponents, linear equations, and factoring. Provides a foundation for further study of mathematics as well as for course work in many technical and scientific fields. Credits earned in this course do not apply to the associate degree. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 0210 - Basic Mathematics

    Credits: 3
    An opportunity for students to master basic mathematical concepts and processes. Topics include a complete study of arithmetic and elementary algebra: fractions, decimals, percentages, whole numbers, and integers; and the arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Credits earned in this course do not apply toward graduation. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 1531 - Calculus I

    Credits: 4
    A review of analytical geometry and introduction to the calculus of one variable. Topics include limits, derivatives of algebraic, transcendental, and trigonometric functions, rates of change, optimization, curve sketching, elements of integration of algebraic, transcendental, and trigonometric functions, area, volume, and practical applications in many fields. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  
  •  

    MAT 1230 - College Algebra

    Credits: 3
    Prepares students for precalculus by reviewing the fundamental concepts of algebra. Topics include equations and inequalities, exponents, radicals, functions, systems of equations, polynomials and, applications. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 1221 - Finite Math

    Credits: 3
    This problem solving course will focus on applications in business, finance, the social sciences, and human services. Topics may include set theory and symbolic logic, linear systems and programming, coordinate systems and graphic techniques, elementary matrix operations, probability, and math of finance. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 1020 - Intermediate Algebra

    Credits: 3
    A course for those interested in additional in-depth study of algebra skills. Includes algebraic laws, polynomials, exponents, linear equalities and inequalities, factoring, functions, set notation, graphing in the Cartesian Coordinate system and applications.This course counts as credit for a CCV degree but would not, by itself, satisfy the math requirement. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 1330 - Pre-Calculus Mathematics

    Credits: 4
    A study of the functions used in calculus, including the exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 2021 - Statistics I

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the basic ideas and techniques of probability and statistics. Topics may include numerical and graphical descriptive measures, probability, random variables, the normal distribution, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. The use of technology may be required. Students must take a math assessment for placement purposes prior to registration.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MAT 2022 - Statistics II

    Credits: 3
    Further study in statistics with an applications focus. Topics studied include multiple regression and correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric methods, and statistical applications in various discipline areas.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings


Meteorology

  
  •  

    MET 1020 - Meteorology

    Credits: 3
    An introductory course that investigates how the atmosphere interacts with solar energy to create dynamic weather systems. Applies basic meteorological and climatic principles to the study of local, regional and global weather patterns. Includes a discussion of global climate patterns.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings


Music

  
  •  

    MUS 1041 - Class Piano

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the piano through group instruction. Reading music, simple chord constructions, and keyboard techniques will be emphasized. Access to a piano for regular musical practice is required. Open to students with no previous musical training.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 1035 - Fundamentals of Singing

    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to vocal technique, ensemble singing, and musicianship for the beginning singer. Students will develop the fundamentals of voice production: posture, breath control and support, tone, resonance and diction. Students will learn songs from various idioms and cultures with an emphasis on group singing and optional opportunities for solo work. Awareness of how the body supports the voice is emphasized. Practical aspects of music theory and musicianship as it relates to the beginning singer will be covered. Open to students with no previous musical training.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 2341 - Guitar I

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to basic picking, fingerpicking, chords, rhythms, bass lines, and accompanying vocals on the six-string guitar. Includes such styles as folk, blues, rock, jazz, country, and classical. Students are introduced to music theory, notation, and history related to guitar. Access to a guitar is required. Open to students with no previous musical training.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 2342 - Guitar II

    Credits: 3
    Students build on elementary skills to explore a variety of guitar styles. Includes further development of individual techniques and continued study of musical notation, history, and theory. Access to a guitar required.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 1025 - Introduction to Jazz Music

    Credits: 3
    Combines a look at the major events of jazz history with a study of the basic structure of jazz to enable students to effectively listen to and appreciate the music. Students will discuss the social and economic conditions that fostered jazz, and the artists who have contributed to its development. Through directed listening, students learn to distinguish among a variety of jazz styles and musicians.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 1028 - Introduction to Rock & Roll

    Credits: 3
    A survey of Rock & Roll from its origins through contemporary rock. Students will discuss the social, economic and political conditions that influenced the development of rock music and the artists who have contributed to its form. Through extensive listening, students will explore a variety of rock styles from 1950s through the present.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 2160 - Introduction to Technology in Music

    Credits: 3
    Surveys the ways in which technology interacts with music from microphones to MIDI. Starting with the fundamentals of acoustics, concepts and processes of sound reinforcement, recording synthesis, and manipulation will be discussed. Includes hands-on experience with digital recording, MIDI, music notation, and other computer-based music applications. Introductory computer skills required.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 1060 - Introduction to World Music

    Credits: 3
    Surveys selected music and rhythms from throughout the world. Through extensive listening, students will explore folk music from every continent and survey the development of musical traditions from a variety of cultures. Elements of world music theory and harmony will also be addressed.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 1010 - Music Appreciation

    Credits: 3
    A survey of the history of Western music including the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and contemporary periods. Through directed listening, students learn to distinguish styles and composers and discuss major historical developments.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    MUS 2220 - Music Ensemble

    Credits: 1
    Students rehearse and perform a variety of musical works in a small group environment. Permission of the instructor is required.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Outdoor Education & Recreation

  
  •  

    OER 1160 - Introduction to Sailing

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to sailing and water safety pertinent to the sport. In this class students will learn about sailing safety, rigging, capsize recovery, points of sail, steering, sail trim, basic maneuvers, leaving and returning to the dock, and basic sailing theory. The overall goal of this class is for students to develop confidence in their ability to sail on their own or with non-sailing friends or family.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHI 2010 - Comparative Religion

    Credits: 3
    Introduces and compares such major religions as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Students study mythical, ethical, and cultic aspects of these religions through reading and discussion of both sacred writings and literature of religious commentary.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PHI 1040 - Introduction to Ethics

    Credits: 3
    Examines personal and professional issues from an ethical point of view, emphasizing how we decide what is right and wrong in our daily lives. Issues might include: civil rights, health care, political concerns, business decisions, war, and the environment.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PHI 1010 - Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits: 3
    Students explore fundamental issues of western philosophy such as existence, the purpose of life, right and wrong, the nature of happiness, appearance and reality, knowledge and speculation. These issues are explored through reading and discussion of major philosophers, ancient and modern.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PHI 2080 - Science & Spirituality

    Credits: 3
    This course examines the evidence of potential common ground between mystical, spiritual, and scientific perspectives on the nature of reality. Modern scientific discoveries relative to the writings of clerics, mystics, and poets from major religions and other spiritual traditions will be discussed and explored.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Physics

  
  •  

    PHY 1110 - Introduction to Astronomy

    Credits: 3
    This course focuses on planets and the solar system, the evolution of stars, galaxies, and the formation of the universe. Concepts of astronomical distance, physics of light and gravity, and general relativity will be used to show how astronomers make their discoveries.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PHY 2025 - Physics for the Environment

    Credits: 4
    This course covers selected topics in physics that are essential in understanding the scientific basis of some current environmental concerns. Topics include energy, conservation of energy, heat, laws of thermodynamics, electric energy, atomic structure, nuclear energy, and ionizing radiation.

    Prerequisites:   or higher


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PHY 1041 - Physics I

    Credits: 4
    This course provides insight into how basic physics principles are used and applied. Students will develop practical problem solving and analytical thinking skills as applied to Newtonian mechanics, energy, fluids, and the mechanical properties of matter. Includes a laboratory. College level   is strongly recommended.

    Prerequisites:   or above


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PHY 1042 - Physics II

    Credits: 4
    A follow-up to Physics I, this course provides continued opportunities for problem solving and practical application of physics principles. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism and light. Includes a laboratory.

    Prerequisites:  


    Click here for course offerings


Political Science

  
  •  

    POS 1020 - American Politics & Government

    Credits: 3
    An examination of the theory and practice of the U.S. political system, from town meetings to Washington, D.C. Topics may include presidential elections, the role of Congress, the President and the Supreme Court, the growth of special interest groups and political action committees, and conflicts between local needs and national policies.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    POS 2020 - Family Law

    Credits: 3
    Provides an understanding of the basic elements of the law as they apply to families. This course covers the topics of marriage, separation, annulment, adoption, spousal and child support, spousal and child abuse, divorce, and more. Students will become familiar with laws relevant to these areas and will be able to discuss law-related issues pertaining to married couples, unmarried cohabitants, and the children who are or may become part of either of these groups.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    POS 1010 - Introduction to Political Science

    Credits: 3
    A survey and analysis of political phenomena in both theoretical and functional aspects. Focus will be on developing a critical understanding of concepts, institutions, values and processes of government and politics.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    POS 1060 - Law & the Individual

    Credits: 3
    An examination of the effects of U.S. law and the legal system on individuals. Includes legal rights and responsibilities of citizens, access to legal systems and the history of significant legal issues that affect the individual. Students will review current laws in such areas as housing, employment, education, and the rights of minors.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    POS 2070 - National Security & Terrorism

    Credits: 3
    A survey of domestic and international terrorism and national security issues. Topics include a brief history of terrorism and its evolution; financing, attack, recruitment and training methods of terrorist groups; terrorist exploitation of the media; and counterterrorism strategies.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    POS 1050 - The Constitution

    Credits: 3
    From historical and contemporary perspectives, this course surveys the framing, revision, and interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. Examines how the original document and subsequent amendments have helped to shape our laws and way of life. Explores contemporary Constitutional issues such as abortion rights, hate speech, gun control, and affirmative action. Includes study of the Vermont Constitution.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings


Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 2060 - Abnormal Psychology

    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the study of abnormal psychology which explores the description, classification, and treatment of deviant behaviors. Topics will include anxiety disorders, depression, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and organic brain syndromes.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2310 - Adolescent Development

    Credits: 3
    An examination of the physiological, psychological, and social development of adolescents. Explores puberty, adolescent sexuality, adolescent rebellion and identity formation, peer relations, idealism and alienation.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2320 - Adult Development

    Credits: 3
    A study of the developmental processes from adolescence through death. The course examines the dominant stages, phases, transitions, and problems of adulthood from several different theoretical perspectives including psychosocial, structural, and learning style. The course also examines the physiological, social, and psychological issues surrounding the aging process.

    Prerequisites:   


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 1020 - Child Abuse & Neglect

    Credits: 3
    Introduction to issues of child abuse and neglect. Topics include historical and cultural context, identification, protective services, treatment and prevention of child abuse and neglect. Especially helpful to workers and parents who deal with children in daycare or human service settings.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2010 - Child Development

    Credits: 3
    A study of child development from conception to preadolescence. The course emphasizes physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth of the child. Developmental theories and their practical applications will be examined.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2180 - Co-Occurring Issues in Substance Abuse & Mental Health

    Credits: 3
    This course will introduce the complex relationship between chemical dependency and numerous mental health conditions. Working with case studies, students will learn practical skills and basic theoretical tools needed for understanding, detecting, diagnosing, and treating co-occurring disorders. Emphasis will be on intervention strategies, screening, assessing risk levels, crisis stabilization, and various treatment responses in dual diagnoses, highlighting the effectiveness of integrated and collaborative treatment programs within family or community-based networks. The course will also examine the secondary effects of co-occurring disorders on individual relapse and recovery and explore connections with social and family systems through domestic violence, family breakdown, trauma, poverty, and delinquency.

    Prerequisites:  ,   or  , and/or  


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2130 - Death & Dying

    Credits: 3
    Examines the nature of our society’s attitudes toward death. Special attention will be given to the ways in which society, families, medical, economic and religious institutions respond to death. Psychological aspects of impending death and the grieving process will be emphasized through the study of the work of Kübler-Ross.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2025 - Development of the Young Child: Ages 3 - 8

    Credits: 3
    This course explores processes of human development from 36 months to eight years of age. Emphasis is on the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of the child. Topics include developmental theories and research, assessment tools, design of inclusive integrated curriculum, and the concept of transition.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
  •  

    PSY 2110 - Educational Psychology

    Credits: 3
    An examination of the principles and theories of learning as they apply to the developmental changes of the child. Special emphasis will be placed on how the child learns and ways of producing optimal conditions for childhood learning.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet basic skills policy requirements. No other course prerequisites required.


    Click here for course offerings

  
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5